On this date in Buffalo Sabres history, January 1, 2000, the Buffalo Sabres defeated the Toronto Maple Leafs 8-1 at HSBC Arena. Stu Barnes, Max Afinogenov and Erik Rasmussen each had two goals in the game that then Leafs coach Pat Quinn referred to as “The New Years Day Massacre.”

Other than the New Years Day Massacre, January 1st games have not gone well for the Buffalo Sabres. In 1971 the Sabres were beaten by the Boston Bruins 9-4, not surprising for a first year expansion team playing against the high scoring Bruins led by Bobby Orr and Phil Esposito.

January 1, 1971 - In the first New Year's Day game in franchise history, the Sabres get bombed by the Boston Bruins, 9-4, at the Aud.

January 1, 1976 - Apparently hung over from the night before, the Sabres are given a 9-6 headache by the visiting Los Angeles Kings. Butch Goring disappoints the Aud throng, not to mention Sabre goalie Gerry Desjardins, by scoring a hat trick.

January 1, 1999 - Teemu Selanne scores a hat trick to lead his Mighty Ducks of Anaheim to a 7-2 rout of the Sabres at the Marena.

On this date in hockey history, January 2, 1980, Gordie Howe of the Hartford Whalers became the first NHL player to appear in games in five different decades. Gordie broke in during the 1940's with the Detroit Red Wings where he played during the 1950's, 60's and 70's. During Howes career, he played 1,767 NHL regular season games and 419 World Hockey Association games


This day in hockey history, January 2nd 1986, In a 7-5 victory over the Boston Bruins at Nassau Coliseum, Mike Bossy scored career goal number 499, from his longtime center Bryan Trottier who fed Bossy at the bottom edge of the right faceoff circle. Bossy's wrist shot beat Boston goalie Doug Keans with 2:22 left in the third period to break a 5-5 tie. Bossy added his 500th goal, scoring into an empty net with 17 seconds remaining.
Bossy was 11th NHL player to reach 500 goals and did so in 647 games, faster than anyone at that time. Wayne Gretzky would eventually get there in only 575 games.
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This day in Toronto Maple Leafs history, January 2nd 1971, rookie Darryl Sittler

scored a pair of goals as the Leafs handed the Detroit Red Wings their worst defeat in franchise history 13-0. The Leafs record for most goals in one game remained safe at

14, set in 1957.


The Buds did set single period records for most goals, seven, most assists, eleven and most points eighteen. Norm Ullman and Paul Henderson who both were ex Red Wings, each had four point games with a pair of goals and two assists. Jim Harrison had four assists. Jacques Plante and Bruce Gamble shared the shutout.
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On this date in hockey history, January 2, 1992, Maple Leafs General Manager Cliff Fletcher engineered a trade which revitalized the Leafs franchise following a decade of ineptitude under the stewardship of owner Harol Ballard. Ten players changed teams

on that day as the Leafs acquired Doug Gilmour from the Calgary Flames along with

Ric Nattress, Jamie Macoun, Craig Berube and Rick Wamsley in exchange for Gary Leeman, Michel Petit, Jeff Reese, Alexander Godnyuk and Kent Manderville. Gilmour led the Leafs from out of the playoffs in 1992 to the Stanley Cup semifinals in 1993 losing an epic seven game series to Wayne Gretzky and the Los Angeles Kings. He

totaled 32-95-127 with 35 points in 21 playoff games in 1993 when he was regarded

by many as the best player in the NHL.








This day in hockey history, January 3rd 1945, Mike "Shaky" Walton was born in Kirkland Lake, Ontario. "Shaky" was the prototypical Ontario boy bred and groomed to be a Toronto Maple Leaf, playing for the Leafs amateur development teams like St. Michael's College, the Neil NcNeil maroons and the Toronto Marlboros before joining the professional ranks splitting time between the Leafs and their minor league teams the CHL Tulsa Oilers and AHL Rochester Americans before joining the Leafs full time in 1966-67. Walton played 257 regular season games with the Leafs scoring 191 points between 1965 and 1971 including 4 goals and 3 assists during the Leafs' 1967 Stanley Cup playoff run. In 1967-68 he played
He was traded to the Philadelphia Flyers for Bernie Parent on January 31st 1971 with the Flyers flipping him immediately to the Boston Bruins for Rick MacLiesh and Danny Schock in one of those old school three way trades. Walton was a good scorer with the Bruins and went 28-28 -56 in 76 games in 1971-72 followed by 25-22-47 in only 56 games in 1972-73.
Walton then jumped to the WHA with the Minnesota Fighting Saints where he put up phenomenal numbers 57-60-117 in 1973-74 before tailing off as the league became more competitive. He returned to the NHL with Vancouver where he closed out the 1975-76 season going 8-8-16 in 10 games,
He had one good season with the Canucks scoring 29-37-66 in 65 games in 1977-78 before splitting his final season with three teams St. Louis, Boston and Chicago scoring 17 goals in 62 games
Walton shares the rare oddity of being awarded a penalty shot in two consecutive games on two consecutive nights. On March 9, 1968 Walton scored. On March 10, 1968 he was unsuccessful.
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This day in New York Rangers history, January 3rd 1987, Don Maloney tied a

franchise record with five assists in a 5-2 Rangers victory over the Quebec Nordiques.
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This day in Chicago Blackhawks history, January 3rd 1943, Reg Bentley

scored a goal, with assists from brothers Max and Doug, in a 3-3 Black

Hawks tie at New York. It was the first time in NHL history with where

three brothers combined for three points  on a goal.


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This day in hockey history, January 3rd 1974, Dave Schultz

notched his first NHL hat trick as the Philadelphia Flyers

defeated the New York Rangers, 4-2 at the Spectrum.


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This day in hockey history, January 3rd 1991, the Los Angeles Kings

defeated the New York Islanders 6-3 with Wayne Gretzky scoring his

700th career goal then adding two more for his 47th career hat trick.

Gretzky was just the fourth NHL player to score 700 goals during

his career.


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This day in hockey history, January 3rd, 1929, the Boston Bruins boarded a train for Montreal, where they would play the Montreal Maroons. Boston's best player, Eddie Shore, was not on the train.
"Mr. Ross didn't know it," said Shore years later "but I was running down the station platform trying to jump on the last car of the train. I didn't make it and had just missed the train because my taxi had been tied up in a traffic accident coming across town."
Shore was determined to get to Montreal in time to play the game. At 11:30pm he hired a car and driver to take him the 560km, even though a blizzard was raging. Shore grew impatient with the chauffeur's slow speed and took over the wheel.
"I was not happy at the rate he was traveling," says Shore, "and I told him so. He apologized and said he didn't have chains and didn't like driving in the winter. The poor fellow urged me to turn back to Boston."
Shore, who grew up in wintery western Canada, was not fazed by the storm. He found an open service station where he acquired some tire chains. And when their visibility was greatly limited due to ice on the Shore found a rather unusual answer.
"I couldn't see out the window," says Shore, "so I removed the top half of the windshield."
He drove most of the way, only letting the chauffeur drive so he could take quick cat naps. During one such stretch the chauffer put the car into a ditch. Shore then hired a team of horses to pull the car out of the ditch, and drove the rest of the way to Montreal!
"I paid $8 for a team of horses," says Shore, "harnessed the horses and pulled the car out of the ditch."
Amazingly, Shore arrived in Montreal around 5:30pm, just enough time to eat a steak, catch a 30 minute nap, and then play the game. Not that coach Art Ross intended to use him after all of that.
"He was in no condition for hockey," says Ross. "His eyes were bloodshot, his face frostbitten and windburned, his fingers bent and set like claws after gripping the steering wheel so long. And he couldn't walk straight. I figure his legs were almost paralyzed from hitting the brake and clutch."
But the headstrong Shore insisted he play. He played the entire game! He played all 60 minutes (minus time served in the penalty box on two minor infractions). He even scored the winning goal!
(Courtesy Greatest hockey legends .com)
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Happy Birthday to Bobby Hull, Born today January 3rd in 1939

in Point Anne, Ontario. Bobby Hull went on to play in 1,063

games for the Chicago Blackhawks, the Winnipeg Jets, and the

Hartford Whalers. In that time, Hull scored 610 goals,

560 assists, and 1,170 points.


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This day in hockey history, January 3rd 1973, the New York Rangers

defeated the Los Angeles Kings 3-0 with Eddie Giacomin earning his

41st career shutout to become the Rangers all time leader in career

shutouts, breaking the team record of 40 set by Dave Kerr. Giacomin

retired with a Rangers team record to 49 shutouts. 

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On this day in New York Rangers history, January 3rd 1996, the Rangers

defeated the Montreal Canadiens 7-4 with Mark Messier scoring two goals

and an assist to move past Bryan Trottier into 6th place on the NHL’s career

scoring list with 1,427 points. Messier finished with 1,887 career points, the

2nd most in NHL history and only 970 points behind Wayne Gretzky.


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On this date in hockey history, January 4, 1984, Wayne Gretzky scored four

goals and four assists as the Edmonton Oilers defeated the Minnesota North

Stars 12-8 at Edmonton's Northlands Coliseum. The 20 combined goals by both

teams made this the second highest scoring game in NHL history. Gretzky had

four points in the first period alone, with his 44th and 45th goals of the season

and two assists. The second period was more of the same with Gretzky adding

another four points with his 46th and 47th goals and another pair of assists.

Having watched Gretzky torch them for eight points in two periods, the North

Stars shut him out in the third period. Each team had 37 shots on goal with

Grant Fuhr going the distance for Edmonton while Don Beaupre (20 min) and

Gilles Meloche split the duties for Minnesota.



On this date in hockey history, January 4th 1976, the Buffalo Sabres became the

first NHL team to defeat a Soviet team when they defeated the touring Soviet

Wings team 12-6 at Buffalo's Memorial Auditorium as 16,433 fans enjoyed the

greatest game in Sabres history.

The Sabres were one of the leagues strongest teams, coming off an appearance

in the 1975 Stanley Cup finals. The Sabres were one of the NHL's best teams,

having appeared in the 1975 Stanley Cup finals, and were under pressure to win

because the Soviets hadn't lost in the first three games of their tour. The tour

was important to the visitors so much so that the Wings team added four players

from the Spartak club to bolster their lineup.

Punch Imlach challenged his team to rise to the challenge and developed a game

plan to ensure victory. He instructed his players to not chase the Soviets as they

wove in and out of their pattern play in their own end but to wait for them at

center ice and to anticipate and pick off their passes. His plan worked to

perfection.

 The game was played at the Buffalo Memorial Auditorium in front of 16,433

fans who roared their approval early in the game as the Sabres defense hit

Soviet players hard at every opportunity. The Sabres opened the scoring at 6:10

of the first period when Josh Guvrement scored. Gilbert Perreault made it 2-0

at 7:10 and his French Connection linemate Rick Martin made it 3-0 half way

through the period. At 13:45 the Wings made it 3-1 before Martin scored again

at 14:23 to make it 4-1. The Wings Sergei Kapustin scored at 19:16 against

Sabres goalie Gerry Desjardins and the period ended 4-2 in favor of the Sabres

who led 17-9 in shots.

The second period featured even more goals with Jim Lorentz scoring at 4:32

and Robert at 5:32 making the score 6-2. Valdimir Repnev made it 6-3 at 5:59.

Jerry Korab scored on the power play at 8:26. At that point the Wings changed

goalies, pulling Alexander Sidelnikov for Alexsandr Kylikov. That didn't help

as Danny Gare scored at 11:44 followed by Peter McNab at 13:17 who made it

9-4. The Wings then pulled Klykov from the net and put Sidelnikov back in.

The Sabres led in shots 34-16 after two periods, leading 9-4.

In the third period Kapustin scored again at 3:28. The Sabres hit double digits

when Fred Stanfield scored at 9:41 to make it 10-5 Yuri Lebedev scored at 11:23 followed by Gare with his second of the game at 14:04 and Brian Spencer at

18:04 for a 12-6 final score. This was the worst defeat ever for a Soviet team in international hockey. The Sabres finished with 46 shots against 25 for the Wings.


Rick Martin was the first star with two goals and five points but for many the

highlight of the game was a particluarly heavy hit Jerry Korab threw on the

Soviets best player Alexander Yakushev. Asked after the game about the

tremendous nature of the body check, Korab replied, “He's Russian and I'm

Polish. Thinks about it.” Martin added, “You could tell they didn't like the fact

that they got outskated. They all had this dumbfounded look on their faces.

They didn't expect that. When we saw that we could skate with them, we just

went for it and it worked.

The Sabres earned a tremendous amount of respect around the NHL for this

victory. When they traveled to Montreal for their next game, the fans at the

Montreal Forum gave the Sabres a standing ovation during pregame warmups.

Imlach called the victory the “all time higlight of the Sabres.” It remains the

greatest game and most significant victory in franchise history.

The downside involved Peter McNab's post game comments about winning the

game for Canada did not resonate well with the Sabres American fans base and

he was subsequently booed during home games. This resulted in his signing

with Boston as a free agent, weakening the Sabres with his departure and

strengthening the Bruins where he became a 40 goal scorer.







This day in hockey history, January 4th 1986 the Edmonton Oilers defeated

the Hartford Whalers 4-3 with Wayne Gretzky picking up an assist to become

the first player in NHL history to get 100 points in seven straight seasons.

Gretzky went on to record 100 points or more for 13 amazing consecutive

seasons. The next highest is Mario Lemieux with 10 consecutive seasons.


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This day in hockey history, January 4th 1973, Bobby Orr broke the career

record for goals by a defenseman when he scored his 163rd career goal in his

428th game, Red Kelly had set the record but it had taken him 846 games to

do so. Orr scored 270 goals in his career. and now ranks 7th all time in career

goals scored by a defenseman with Ray Bourque holding the current record

with 410 goals.


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This day in hockey history, January 4th 1992 he New York Rangers lost 6-4 to

the New Jersey Devils with Mike Gartner scoring a goal and an assist to

become the 33rd player in NHL history with 1,000 career points. Gartner

finished his career with 708 goals and 1,335 points. The 708 goals are 6th all

time and the 1,335 points are 30th all time.


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This day in Toronto Maple Leafs history, January 4th 1988, Borje Salming

played his 1000th NHL regular season game with the Leafs. Salming was the

first European-trained player to play 1000 games in the NHL and is one of five

players who played 1000 games in a Leaf uniform. He holds the Maple Leaf

team record for most career assists with 620. Salming was a 2nd team All-Star

5 times and a first team All-Star in 1977. He was inducted into the Hall of

Fame in 1996.


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This day in Toronto Maple Leafs history, January 4th 1971 an off ice

transaction spelled doom for the Leafs when Stafford Smythe and Harold

Ballard had assumed control of Maple Leaf Gardens and the team. Ballard

prepared a will for Stafford to sign including a clause that allowed Ballard

the option to buy all of Stafford's shares upon his death. Smythe signed the

document and dies a few months later. Ballard then exercised his option and

took control of the Leafs and the Gardens from the Smythe family. Under

Ballard's control, the Leafs became known as the Maple Laffs during a dark

decade for Leafs fans in the 1980's a period which only ended with Ballards

death.


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This day in hockey history, January 5th 1983, the Edmonton Oilers defeated the Winnipeg Jets 8-3 with Wayne Gretzky scoring two goals and three assists to

reach 100 points for the season. This was his fourth season in the NHL and he

topped 100 points in each one.
Gretzky got his 100th point in just his 42nd game of the season, meaning he

scored an average of 2.38 points per game. He finished the season with 196

points.


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The New York Rangers became NHL trend setters on this day in hockey

history, January 5th 1957, as the NHL made it's network TV debut in the

United States when CBS televised an afternoon game from Madison Square

Garden with the New York Rangers defeating the Chicago Blackhawks 4-1.
The 1957 Rangers were also the first team in NHL history to wear colored

gloves. The red, white, and blue mitts matched the team attire and gave birth

to a new style in the NHL. Shortly after the Rangers transition the Maple

Leafs switched to colored gloves in 1958-1959.


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This day in New York Rangers history, January 5th 1963, Andy Bathgate

scored a goal in his 10th consecutive game setting a Rangers record as

New York tied the Montreal Canadiens, 2-2, at the Forum.


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On this date in hockey history, January 5, 1979, Wayne Gretzky and Gordie

Howe became line mates on the WHA all star team which played the Moscow

Dynamo in a three game series. At Edmonton's Northlands Coliseum. The

WHA All-Stars were coached by Jacques Demers who asked Gordie Howe if it

was okay to put him on a line with Wayne Gretzky and his son Mark Howe. In

the first game, the line scored seven points, as the WHA All-Stars won by a

score of 4-2. In the second game, Gretzky and Mark Howe each scored a goal

and Gordie Howe picked up an assist as the WHA won 4-2. The line did not

score in the final game but the WHA won by a score of 4-3.









On this date in hockey history, January 5, 1993, Brett Hull scored two goals for the St. Louis Blues in a 6-1 victory over the Edmonton Oilers. They were his 300th and 301st goals as for the Blues, making him the third player in team history to score 300 goals for the franchise.









On this date in hockey history, January 6, 1974, Reggie Leach scored

his first NHL hat trick for the California Seals when they lost 9-4 to the

Chicago Black Hawks.












On this date in hockey history, January 5, 1980, the Philadelphia Flyers ran their unbeaten streak to 35 games with a pair of third period goals in a 4-2 victory

over the Buffalo Sabres. The Flyers went 25-0-10 during the streak which

ended the very next day against the Minnesota North Stars.

On this date in hockey history, January 5, 1981, John Tonelli tied a New York

Islanders team record with five goals and the usually goal scoring Mike Bossy

set a team record with six assists during a 6-3 victory over the Toronto Maple

Leafs at Nassau Coliseum.















On this date in hockey history, January 5, 1957, retired Toronto captain

Ted Kennedy comes back from a year and a half absence to post 6 goals

and 16 assists in 30 games to help lift the floundering Leafs from their

13-20-7 record into the playoffs. The team didn't improve with Kennedy

going 8-14-8 during his 30 games to close the season at 21-34-15 missing

the playoffs in fifth place. But Kennedy's 30 points pro rated over the full

70 game schedule would have him leading the team in scoring with 55 points.

Not bad for a retired guy.













On this date in Toronto hockey history, January 5th, 1918 – The Montreal

Wanderers were scheduled to visit the Toronto Arenas. However, the Wanderers

had withdrawn from the NHL after their home arena had burned down. The

Arenas dressed six players for the game with no opposition on the ice. When

the referee dropped the puck Arenas center Corb Denneny shot the puck into

the empty net to ensure a victory. The Arenas were awarded a 1-0 default

victory. The Arena's became the St. Pats in 1919 and were renamed the Maple

Leafs in 1927.







On this date in hockey history, January 6, 1942 – The Chicago Blackhawks were playing the Bruins at Boston Garden when an unusual announcement was made: “Please return any pucks deflected into the stands, due to a wartime shortage of rubber.”

On this date in hockey history, January 6, 1973, Tony Esposito recorded his 35th career shutout as the visiting Chicago Blackhawks defeated the Minnesota North Stars 2-0. Esposito appeared in 56 games for the Hawks that 1972-73 season with four shutouts, a 2.51 GAA and a 32-17-7 record. Gary “Suitcase” Smith played in 23 games with a 10-10-2 record and a 3.54 GAA. Esposito earned the nickname “Tony O” when he earned 15 shutouts as an NHL rookie.




A tale which doesn't reflect well on the modern game, On this date in

hockey history, January 6th, 1994 – The Detroit Red Wings defeat the

San Jose Sharks 10-3 at the Shark Tank. Ray Sheppard and Viacheslav

Kozlov each had a hat trick. My God, 13 goals in one game! It would

take three games today to see that many goals.




This day in hockey history, January 6th 1931, Dickie Moore was born in

Montreal, Quebec. Moore spent 12 seasons with the Montreal Canadiens

from 1951-1963 winning six Stanley Cups and two Art Ross trophies as

the NHL scoring leader in 1957-58 and 1958-59 when he tallied a then

record 96 points. Moore retired in 1963 but returned during the 1964-65

season to play with the Toronto Maple Leafs playing 38 games with 2

goals and 4 assists. He came out of retirement again to play for the new

expansion St. Louis Blues and coach Scotty Bowman in 1967-68 playing

27 regular season and leading the Blues in playoff scoring with 14 points

in 18 games and a showdown with Montreal in the finals. Moore was

elected to the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1974.


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This day in hockey history, Januray 6th 1927, two of the NHL's

legendary franchises faced off for the first time ever as the New York

Rangers beat the Montreal Canadiens, 1-0 Madison Square Garden.


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This day in hockey history, January 6th 1993, Wayne Gretzky played in

his 1,000th NHL game, and picks up an assist but his Los Angeles Kings

lose 6-3 to the Tampa Bay Lightning. Gretzky was returning to the lineup

after missing 38 games due to a herniated disc and played only 45 games

that season going 15-40-55. His time off seemed to re-energize his game

as he led the Kings to the Stanley Cup finals with 15 goals and 40 points

in 24 playoff games.


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This day in hockey history, January 7th 1981, Marcel Dionne became the

14th player in NHL history to score 1,000 career points. His milestone

came in a 5-3 win at Hartford, in Dionne's 740th career game. This was

fastest 1,000 points in NHL history at the time.


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This day in Montreal Canadiens history, January 7th; 

1928: Howie Morenz scored his third career hat trick in a 9-1 win over

the Maple Leafs in Toronto.
1933: George Hainsworth recorded his 70th career shutout in a 1-0 win

over the visiting Ottawa Senators. Hainsworth became the second goalie

in NHL history (after Alex Connell) to get 70 shutouts.
1954: Maurice Richard scored his 21st career hat trick and added an assist

in a 7-3 win over the visiting Maple Leafs.
1961: Frank Selke became the fourth general manager in NHL history to

record 500 wins when the Canadiens beat the New York Rangers 6-3 at the

Forum.
1969: John Ferguson scored a goal and added three assists in a 6-3 win

over the North Stars in Minnesota.

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On this date in hockey history, January 7th 1984, Wayne Gretzky scored

three goals for his seventh hat trick of the season (and 25th of his career)

in a 5-3 victory over the Hartford Whalers. The goals were his 48th, 49th

and 50th of the season in only his 42nd game. This was Gretzky's fifth

consecutive 50 goal season in only five seasons.


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Canadian culture was altered forever on this day in hockey history,

January 7th, 1933 – when the CBC broadcast the first hockey game

from coast to coast as the Detroit Red Wings defeated the Toronto Maple

Leafs 6-1 at Maple Leaf Gardens. Eventually the CBC's Hockey Night In

Canada would own Saturday night in the Dominion of Canada.









On this date in hockey history, January 7th, 1992 – Ray Ferraro scored

four goals for the New York Islanders and added an assist during a 5-2

victory in Detroit against the Red Wings. He scored his 200th goal in that

game. Today a new generation of hockey fans knows Ray Ferraro as a

broadcaster on the NHL Network and TSN.









On this date in hockey history, January 7th 1989, The Buffalo Sabres

earned their 700th win in franchise history when they defeated the

Toronto Maple Leafs 6-1 at Maple Leaf Gardens. Christian Ruuttu led

the way for Buffalo with three assists.










This day in hockey history, January 7th 1975, Dave “Tiger” Williams

made his debut with the Toronto Maple Leafs. Williams racked up 1,670

penalty minutes with the Leafs in 407 games, adding 109 goals and 241

points. Tiger is the NHL's regular season career penalty minutes leader

with 3,966 in 962 games.


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This day in Buffalo Sabres history, January 7th 1971, Phil Goyette

scores one goal and picks up four assists for five points in a 7-4 win

against the Detroit Red Wings at the Aud.


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On this date in hockey history, January 8th 1944, Bill Cowley of the

Boston Bruins led the NHL in scoring with 53 points in 26 games, 2.04

points per game. He injured his shoulder missing 14 games, and returned

to play the final ten games of the season with 18 points, finishing with 71

points in 36 games, an average of 1.97 points per game. If Cowley hadn't

been injured, he likely would have become the NHL's first 100 point

scorer. (The NHL played a 50 game schedule that season.)

Cowley was the early Wayne Gretzky of the NHL and was the greatest

playmaker in hockey during his career. He held the NHL record for assists

in a single season with 45 and would have broken the points record of 73

but for his injury in 1944. When he retired in 1947, he led the NHL in

career points with 548 and in career helpers with 353.


On this date in hockey history, Dave “Tiger” Williams made his debut with the Toronto Maple Leafs. Williams racked up 1,670 penalty minutes with the Leafs in 407 games, adding 109 goals and 241 points. Tiger is the NHL's regular season career penalty minutes leader with 3,966 in 962 games.


On this date in hockey history, January 8th 1947, Howie Meeker scored five goals in a 10-4 victory over the Chicago Black Hawks at Maple Leafs Gardens to set a rookie record for most goals in a game. Or did he?

On this date in hockey history, January 9th, 1979 – Bobby Orr's number four was officially retired by the Boston Bruins in a pregame ceremony at the Boston Garden. According to hockey historian Brian McFarlane, the Bruins fans in attendance gave Orr a standing ovation that lasted 27 minutes. The game featured the touring Soviet Wings team, maybe the management felt that ticket sales might be light so they guaranteed a sellout with the Bobby Orr festivities. The Wings beat the Bruins 4-1.

On this date in hockey history, Januray 9th, 1993 – Mike Gartner of the New York Rangers scored twice in a 4-3 road loss to the Philadelphia Flyers. In so doing, Gartner became the first NHL player to score at least 25 goals in his first 14 seasons. Gartner finished that season with 45 goals. He scored 28 times the next season, extending the streak to 15 seasons.



This day in Montreal Canadiens history history, January 15th 1986, Patrick Roy

recorded his first career NHL shutout in a 4-0 win over the Winnipeg Jets at

the Forum.


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This day in Buffalo Sabres history, January 15th 1970 Buffalo's new expansion

team did't have a name yet when they named George "Punch" Imlach as the

first General Manager and first Coach of their new franchise. Nine months

later the team would begin their first season.


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This day in hockey history, January 15th 1960, Gordie Howe passed Maurice

"Rocket" Richard as the NHL's all time leading scorer when he scored a goal

and an assist as the Detroit Red Wings defeated the Chicago Blackhawks 3-1 at

Olympia Stadium. The two points gave Howe 947 career points in 888 games.


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This day in hockey history, January 15th 1966, Bobby Hull became the first

player in Blackhawks history to score 300 career goals when he scored four

times for his 17th career hat trick.


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This day in Edmonton Oilers history, January 15th 1982, the Oilers lost 7-1

to the Toronto Maple Leafs at the Gardens. This loss ended rookie goaltender

Grant Fuhr's 23 game unbeaten streak (15-0-8). Fuhr has lost his first NHL

game before embarking on the streak so his record on the season up tp this

point was 15-1-8.


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This day in Toronto Maple Leafs history, January 15th 1969, the Leafs tied

the Boston Bruins 5-5 at Maple Leaf Gardens with Tim Horton scoring to

become the first defenseman in Leafs history to score 100 career goals. This

was Horton's 19th season with Toronto.


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This day in hockey history, January 16th 1946, Gordie Howe made his

NHL debut memorable wearing number 17 for the Detroit Red Wings by

scoring a goal and getting into two fights as the Wings tied the Toronto

Maple Leafs 3-3..


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This day in Toronto Maple Leafs history, January 16th 1938, the Leafs handed

the Chicago Black Hawks a 7-2 defeat behind Regis "Pep" Kelly's three goal

hat trick including two short handed goals. Theo Fleury of the Calgary Flames

is the only other player in NHL history to score three shorthanded goals in one

game.

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This day in Toronto Maple Leafs history, January 16th 1934, Ken Doraty

recorded his first NHL hat trick in overtime during the Leafs 7-4 victory

over the Ottawa Senators. Back then, tied games played a 10 minute

overtime period without sudden death. Needless to say, this record for

most goals in a single overtime period will never be broken.


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This day in hockey history, January 16th January 16th 1983, Flyers rookie

goalie Bob Froese recorded his first NHL shutout defeating the New York

Rangers 4-0 as Philadelphia tied an NHL record with their 8th straight road

victory,


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This day in New York Rangers history, January 16th 1936, Bert Connolly of

the Rangers scored the first penalty shot goal in team history, and it was the

decisive goal in a 1-0 win at Toronto. The penalty shot was introduced in the

1934-35 NHL season with and the shot was taken much like penalty kicks are

taken in soccer with the puck placed in a circle 10 feet from the goal line. The

player had the option to skate or remain stationary but the shot had to be taken

from inside the circle.


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Happy birthday to one of hockey's most famous pioneers, Frank Zamboni born on this day January 16th 1901.
Most hockey fans recognize the name Zamboni. But who was the man behind the machine? This is the amazingly inspirational
story of an Italian immigrant's son who became wealthy beyond his wildest dreams. Although his parents named him Junior, he never used the suffix throughout his life.
He was born as the third of four children in Eureka, Utah, a small town south of Salt Lake
City. His father, Francesco Giuseppe, had immigrated as a 22-year old in 1885 to the United States from Arsio in the snow-capped region of Tyrol which at that time was a part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. His mother, Carmelina Masoero, hailed from Avigliana in the Piedmont region of northern Italy. She came to the United States when she was 17 in 1887 and married Francesco shortly after her arrival.
When Frank was a year old, his parents bought a farm in Lava Hot Springs, near Pocatello, Idaho, directly north of Salt Lake City. It was there in the high mountain country that he developed a lifelong knack for working with mechanical equipment.
When he reached the age of 15, he was pulled out of the ninth grade to help his father on the family farm while he also worked as a mechanic in a local garage. In 1920 his parents sold the farm and moved with Frank and his siblings to Clearwater in the harbor district of Los Angeles, California. Frank's older brother, George Angelo, had an automobile garage there. Upon their arrival, Frank and his younger brother, Lawrence Eugene, started working in George's garage and then in a blacksmith shop.
After a year, they saved enough money to send Frank to the Coyne Trade School in Chicago to learn the electric business. When he returned in 1922, Frank and Lawrence went into business
together as the Service Electric Co., later known as the Zamboni Bros. Co., in the neighboring town of Hynes. In addition to electrical work, they also specialized in drilling water wells and installing water pumping equipment for many dairies in the area.
On February 21, 1923, Frank married Norda Ileta Chamberlain, shortly before her 20th birthday, in Downey, California. They would have three children: Arlene Loa, Jean Esther and Richard Frank.
Frank was soon approached by the New Way Electric Co. of Los Angeles to solve a problem for the firm.
In 1924 Frank invented an adjustable electrical resister and obtained U.S. Patent No. 1,655,034 on January 3, 1928. During the next three years he obtained two more U.S. patents on electrical coils for the New Way Electric Co. while his brother Lawrence obtained two U.S. patents on braking devices for the Universal Brake Co. of nearby Pasadena.
In 1927 the two brothers had built an ice making plant from where they sold block ice wholesale to local fruit and vegetable packing plants that were shipping their produce out of the area in rail cars.
When Willis Carrier obtained a U.S. patent and started marketing his air conditioning and refrigeration units in 1935, the Zamboni brothers saw the end in sight for the ice manufacturing part of their company. So, in 1939, they sold the block ice business but kept their refrigeration equipment which they used in the building of an ice rink across the street.
In January 1940, with their cousin Peter Zamboni, the brothers opened Iceland as one of the largest ice rinks in the country with 20,000 square feet of skating surface. The 100 by 200-foot open-air arena could accommodate 800 skaters. In May 1940, a dome was
added to protect the floor from the warm southern California sun. Approximately 150,000 skaters used the rink yearly.
The level surface at Iceland was popular because Frank had succeeded in eliminating the rippled effect often caused by pipe floors. For his efforts, Frank obtained U.S. Patent No. 2,411,919 on December 3, 1946.
While serving as a member of the local Chamber of Commerce, Frank was elected president of the Kiwanis Club in 1946. In that capacity, he set up a project to unify the town of Hynes where his business was located with the neighboring town of Clearwater
where he lived.
On January 1, 1948, his project came to fruition when the new combined city of Paramount was officially established. After that success, Frank returned his attention to a technical problem which had perplexed him since the ice rink was opened. Usually, it took three experienced men 1 1/2 hours to resurface manually the rink after the skaters had chipped, scraped and cut the ice floor. Frank thought that too much skating time was being lost each day. He believed that there must be a better, quicker and more efficient way to resurface the entire rink.
Initially, he had purchased a Ford-Ferguson tractor in March, 1942 and started to experiment. When his first machine did not work well, he put his designs aside for five years until late July, 1947. After several more unsuccessful models, he finally developed
one that worked during the late summer of 1948.
Within a year, his Model A was perfected so that one man could do the entire operation in only ten minutes! Essentially a sharp-edged blade shaves the surface of the ice. After a horizontal screw
gathers the shavings, a conveyor (now a vertical screw) propels the shavings into a snow tank. Water is then fed onto the ice from a second tank and a squeegee-like conditioner flushes dirt and debris out of any remaining grooves and indentations in the ice. Next, the
dirty water is vacuumed up, filtered and returned to the second tank. Finally, the rink floor is renewed when clean hot water is spread on the ice by a towel behind the conditioner and then is frozen.
On May 16, 1949, he applied for a U.S. patent.
Later in the year, he established Frank J. Zamboni & Co. as a family partnership to manufacture his machine starting with an improved Model B. The first sale was made for about $5,000 to the Pasadena Winter Garden in 1950. The second sale was made to the orwegian Olympic figure skater and film actress, Sonia Henie (1912-1969), for her "Hollywood on Ice Review" tour.
Frank worked almost around the clock to finish the second machine and personally drove the parts to Chicago where it was assembled. She liked it so much that she soon bought the third machine.
The fourth machine was sold to the Ice Capades in 1952. It now resides in the U.S. Hockey Hall of Fame in Eveleth, Minnesota.
After more than four years of pendency, U.S. Patent No. 2,642,679 finally issued to him on June 23, 1953. In 1954, ten units were
built and sold. His 24-year old son, Richard Frank, joined him in the family business in 1956. Over the next 15 years, Zamboni obtained four more U.S. patents which he assigned to his company.
There was so much demand for the new fangled machine that he opened a second manufacturing plant in Brantford, Ontario, Canada, and a branch sales office in Zurich, Switzerland. Each of the two plants still employ from 50 to 60 people who assemble by
hand about 200 machines a year.
The Zamboni® Machine was soon widely introduced throughout the United States, Canada and Europe. Also, the machines came to play a prominent role at world and Olympic ice competitions. Each machine usually lasts for about ten to 20 years but some are still operational after almost 50 years!
During this period of growth, Frank became a charter member of the Ice Skating Institute of America and was inducted into its Hall of Fame in 1965. He then served as its president from 1965 to 1967.
After he finished his term at the age of 66, a new challenge came to him when he was approached by the Monsanto Chemical Co. As the manufacturer of AstroTurf®, the company had a problem with their product: rain tended to stay on top of the artificial grass and would not soak through into the ground underneath. Frank tackled the problem and invented the Astro Zamboni® Machine which sucked up and pumped water off the turf at the incredible rate of about 400 gallons per minute! For this invention, he obtained two U.S. patents in 1973 and 1974. This machine has been credited with saving several World Series baseball games from being rained out.
Not done yet, the 82-year old genius obtained his 15th and last U.S. Patent No. 4,372,617 on February 8, 1983, for an edger which trimmed ice that built up at the base of dasher boards in rinks. The edger is mounted on the conditioner of the ice resurfacing machine.
Five years later, Zamboni was invited to receive an Honorary Doctorate of Engineering from Clarkson University in Potsdam, New York.
Although Zamboni is gone, the honors continue. A year ago in February, 2000, he was inducted into the U.S. Figure Skating Hall of Fame. Also, the city of Paramount has built a one-half acre ice skating sculpture garden downtown, just 300 feet west of Iceland
which is still operated today by the Zamboni family.
Also in the year 2000, the company produced it 7,000th ice resurfacing machine.


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On this date in hockey history, January 17, 1971 – the Boston Bruins took 63 shots on goal defeating the Toronto Maple Leafs 9-1 at Boston Garden. The loss dropped the Leafs record to 21-21-3



This day in hockey history, January 17th 1929, Jacques Plante was born in

Mauricie, Quebec. The family moved to Shawinigan Falls, where his father

worked in one of the local factories. In 1932, Plante began to play hockey,

skateless and with a tennis ball, using a goaltender's hockey stick his father

had carved from a tree root.


Plante suffered from asthma starting in early childhood. This prevented him

from skating for extended periods so he gravitated to playing goaltender. As

his playing progressed, Jacques received his first regulation goaltender's stick

for Christmas of 1936. His father made Plante's first pads by stuffing potato

sacks and reinforcing them with wooden panels.
As a child, Plante played hockey outdoors in the bitterly cold Quebec winters.

His mother taught him how to knit his own tuques to protect him from the

cold. Plante continued knitting and embroidering throughout his life and wore

his hand-knitted tuques while playing and practicing until entering the National

Hockey League.
Plante's first foray into organized hockey came at age 12. He was watching his

school's team practice, when the coach ordered the goaltender off the ice after

a heated argument over his play, and Plante asked to replace him. The coach

permitted him to play since there was no other available goaltender; it was

quickly apparent that Plante could hold his own, despite the other players

being many years older than he was. He impressed the coach and stayed on as

the team's number one goaltender.
Two years later, Plante was playing for five different teams; the local factory

team, and teams in the midget, juvenile, junior and intermediate categories.

Plante demanded a salary from the factory team's coach after his father told

him that the other players were being paid because they were company

employees. The coach paid Plante 50 cents per game to retain him and maintain

the team's popularity.
Afterwards, Plante began to receive various offers from other teams; he was

offered $80 per week, a lot of money in those days, to play for a team in

England, and a similar offer to play for the Providence Reds of the American

Hockey League. Plante passed them up because his parents wanted him to

finish high school. He graduated with top honours in 1947. Upon graduation,

he took a job as a clerk in a Shawinigan factory. A few weeks later, the Quebec

Citadels offered Plante $85 per week to play for them; he accepted, marking the beginning of his professional career.
Plante joined the Quebec Citadelles in 1947. It was while playing for the

Citadelles that Plante started to play the puck outside his crease.He developed

this technique when he recognized that the team's defense was performing poorly.
Fans found Plante's unconventional playing style to be exciting, but it angered his coaches. They believed that a goaltender should stay in net and let his players

recover the puck. Plante had come to the conclusion that as long as he was in

control of the puck, the opponents could not shoot it at him, this became a

standard tactic for goaltenders.
The same season, the Citadelles beat the Montreal Junior Canadiens in the

league finals, with Plante being named most valuable player on his team. The

Montreal Canadiens' general manager, Frank J. Selke, became interested in

acquiring Plante as a member of the team. In 1948, Plante received an invitation

to the Canadiens' training camp. On August 17, 1949, Selke offered Plante a

contract with the Canadiens' organization. Plante played for Montreal's affiliate

Royal Montreal Hockey Club, earning $4,500 for the season, and an extra $500

for practicing with the Canadiens.
In January 1953, Plante was called up to play for the Canadiens. Bill Durnan,

the goaltender who played for Montreal when Plante first began, had retired,

and Gerry McNeil, their top goaltender, had fractured his jaw.
Plante played for three games, but in that short time, he generated controversy.

Coach Dick Irvin, Sr. did not wish his players to stand out by any addition to

their regular uniforms. Plante always wore one of his tuques while playing

hockey, and after an argument with Irvin, all of Plante's tuques had vanished

from the Montreal locker room. Even without his good luck charm, Plante gave

up only four goals in the three games he played, all of them wins.
Later during the 1952–53 NHL season, Plante played in the playoffs against

the Chicago Black Hawks. He won his first playoff game with a shutout.

Montreal won that series and eventually the Stanley Cup. Plante's name was

engraved on the Cup for the first time.
At the beginning of 1953, McNeil was still the starting goaltender for the

Canadiens. Selke assigned Plante to the Buffalo Bisons of the AHL so fans in

the United States would get to know him. Plante was instantly successful;

Fred Hunt, the general manager of the Bisons, told Kenny Reardon, Montreal's

recruiting manager, that, "he's the biggest attraction since the good old days of

Terry Sawchuk."
By the end of the 1953–54 NHL season, Plante was well-entrenched within the

NHL. In the spring of 1954, he underwent surgery to correct his left hand,

which he had broken in his childhood. He could not move the hand well

enough to catch high shots and compensated by using the rest of his body. The

operation was successful.
On February 12, 1954, Plante was called up to the Canadiens and established

himself as their starting goaltender, he did not return to the minor leagues for

many years. Plante was the Canadiens' number one goaltender at the beginning

of the 1954–55 NHL season. On March 13, 1955, with only four games left in

the season, an on-ice brawl resulted in the suspension of Montreal's leading

scorer, Maurice Richard, for the rest of the season and the playoffs. Four nights

later, playing in Montreal in front of an angry crowd, Plante was witness to the

riot that followed. It began at the Forum by angry hockey game spectators and

spread along Montreal's Ste. Catherine Street, causing injuries to police and

fans and extensive damage to businesses and property. The Canadiens

subsequently lost to the Detroit Red Wings in the finals.
For the 1955–56 season, Plante was the unchallenged starting goaltender of the Canadiens; Gerry McNeil had not played the previous season and was sent to

the Montreal Royals. Charlie Hodge, Plante's backup the previous season, was

sent to a Canadiens' farm team in Seattle.
Later that season, Montreal won the Stanley Cup, the first of what would be

five consecutive Stanley Cup championship seasons. The next season, Plante

missed most of November because of chronic bronchitis, a consequence of the

asthma that had affected him since childhood. During the 1957–58 NHL season,

the Canadiens won their third straight Stanley Cup despite injuries to Plante

and other members of the team.
Plante's asthma was getting worse. He sustained a concussion with just a few

weeks left in the season and missed three games of the playoffs. In the sixth

game of the Stanley Cup finals, Plante's asthma was making him dizzy, and he

was having difficulty concentrating; he collapsed at the end of the game after

teammate Doug Harvey scored the series-winning goal. The Canadiens went

on to win the Stanley Cup again at the close of the 1958–59 season.
During the 1959–60 NHL season, Plante wore a goaltender mask for the first

time in a regular season game. Although Plante had used his mask in practice

since 1956 after missing 13 games because of sinusitis, head coach Toe Blake

did not permit him to wear it during regulation play. However, on

November 1, 1959, Plante's nose was broken when he was hit by a shot fired

by Andy Bathgate three minutes into a game against the New York Rangers,

and he was taken to the dressing room for stitches. When he returned, he was

wearing the crude home-made goaltender mask that he had been using in

practices. Blake was livid, but he had no other goaltender to call upon and

Plante refused to return to the goal unless he wore the mask. Blake agreed on

the condition that Plante discard the mask when the cut healed. The Canadiens

won the game 3–1. During the following days Plante refused to discard the

mask, and as the Canadiens continued to win, Blake was less vocal about it.

The unbeaten streak stretched to 18 games. Plante did not wear the mask, at

Blake's request, against Detroit on March 8, 1960; the Canadiens lost 3–0, and

the mask returned for good the next night. That year the Canadiens won their

fifth straight Stanley Cup, which was Plante's last.
Plante subsequently designed his own and other goaltenders' masks. He was

not the first NHL goaltender known to wear a face mask. Montreal Maroons'

Clint Benedict wore a crude leather version in 1929 to protect a broken nose,

but Plante introduced the mask as everyday equipment, and it is now mandatory equipment for goaltenders.
Hampered by terrible pain in his left knee during the 1960–61 NHL season,

Plante was sent down to the minor league Montreal Royals. Torn cartilage was

found in his knee, and the knee was surgically repaired during the summer of

1961. The next season Plante became only the fourth goaltender to win the

Hart Memorial Trophy - he also won the Vezina Trophy for the sixth time.

The 1962–63 season was unsettling for Plante. His asthma had worsened,

and he missed most of the early season. His relationship with his coach, Toe

Blake, continued to deteriorate because of Plante's persistent health problems.

Later, Plante was at the center of a major controversy when he claimed that net

sizes in the NHL were not uniform, thus giving a statistical advantage to

goaltenders playing for the Chicago Black Hawks, Boston Bruins, and New

York Rangers. His claim was later confirmed as the result of a manufacturing

error. After the Canadiens were eliminated for the third straight year in the first

playoff round during the spring of 1963, there was mounting pressure for

change from their fans and media. Growing tension between Plante and Blake

because of Plante's inconsistent work ethic and demeanor caused Blake to

declare that for the 1963–64 season either he or Plante must go. On June 4,

1963, Plante was traded to the New York Rangers, with Phil Goyette and Don

Marshall in exchange for Gump Worsley, Dave Balon, Leon Rochefort, and Len

Ronson. Plante played for the Rangers for one full season and part of a second.

He retired in 1965 while playing for the minor-league Baltimore Clippers of the American Hockey League requiring surgery on his right knee.
Plante took a job with Molson as a sales representative but remained active in

the NHL. In 1965, Scotty Bowman asked Plante to play for the Montreal Jr.

Canadiens in a game against the Soviet National Team. Honoured to represent

his country, Plante agreed, and after receiving permission from both the Rangers

(who owned his rights) and Molson, he began practicing. The Canadiens won

2–1, and Plante was named first star of the game.
At the beginning of the 1967–68 NHL season, Plante received a call from his ex-teammate Bert Olmstead seeking some help coaching the expansion Oakland

Seals. Plante coached mainly by example, and after the three-week training

camp he returned home to Montreal. Plante also played an exhibition game

with the Seals. Rumours swirled that Plante was planning a comeback.
In June 1968, Plante was drafted by the St. Louis Blues and signed for $35,000

for the 1968–69 season. In his first season with the Blues, Plante split the

goaltending duties with Glenn Hall. He won the Vezina Trophy that season for

the seventh time, surpassing Bill Durnan's record.
While playing for the Blues in the 1969–70 playoffs against the Boston Bruins,

a shot fired by Fred Stanfield and redirected by Phil Esposito hit Plante in the

forehead, knocking him out and breaking his fibreglass mask. The first thing

Plante said after he regained consciousness at the hospital was that the mask

saved his life.
That game proved to be his last for the Blues, and he was traded in the summer

of 1970 to the Toronto Maple Leafs. He led the NHL with the lowest goals

against average during his first season with the Maple Leafs. At season's end,

he was named to the NHL's second All-Star team, his seventh such honor. He

continued to play for the Leafs until he was traded to the Boston Bruins late in

the 1972–73 season, recording a shutout against the Black Hawks in his debut

for the Bruins. He played eight regular season and two playoff games for the

Bruins to finish that season, his last in the NHL.
Plante accepted a $10 million, 10-year contract to become coach and general

manager of the Quebec Nordiques of the World Hockey Association in 1973.

He was highly dissatisfied with his and the team's performance and resigned at

the end of the 1973–74 season. Coming out of retirement once more, Plante

played 31 games for the Edmonton Oilers of the WHA in the 1974–75 season.

Plante retired during the Oilers' training camp in 1975–76 after receiving news

that his youngest son had died.
Plante had a well-earned reputation for his ability to analyse the game of

hockey. He began shouting directions to his teammates during games in his first

stint in the minor leagues and kept extensive notes on opposing players and

teams throughout his career.
He made his debut in the broadcasting booth during his first retirement in the

1960s as a colour commentator for broadcasts of Quebec Junior League games

alongside Danny Gallivan of Hockey Night in Canada fame. Radio Canada, the

French language branch of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, brought

Plante aboard as on-air analyst for its television broadcasts of the 1972 Summit

Series between the national team of the Soviet Union and a Canadian team

made up of professional players from the NHL. Plante was one of the few

North American analysts who dissented from the widely held belief in the s

uperiority of the Canadian team.
Plante also wrote extensively on hockey. He wrote hockey columns starting

early in his career. His seminal work, Goaltending, was published in 1972. In

his book Plante outlined a program of goaltender development that included

off ice exercises, choice of equipment, styles of play, and game-day preparation.

He also advised on best coaching methods for both young and advanced

goaltenders. His book remained popular with coaches and players and was

reprinted in both French and English in 1997, 25 years after it was first

published.
Starting in 1967, Plante was one of the instructors at École moderne de hockey,

a summer hockey school for young players. His reputation as a teacher spread,

and he traveled to Sweden in 1972 at the invitation of the Swedish Hockey

Federation, teaching the top goaltenders in the country and their coaches and

trainers. During his first and second retirements, Plante also coached

goaltenders and consulted for several NHL teams, including the Oakland Seals, Philadelphia Flyers, Montreal Canadiens and St. Louis Blues.
He moved to Switzerland with his second wife, Raymonde Udrisard, but

remained active on the North American hockey scene as an analyst, adviser and goaltender trainer. He was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1978. In

the fall of 1985, Plante was diagnosed with terminal stomach cancer. He died

in a Geneva hospital in February 1986 and was buried in Sierre, Switzerland.


When his coffin was carried from the church following the funeral mass, it

passed under an arch of hockey sticks held high by a team of young hockey

players from Quebec, visiting Switzerland for a tournament.
Plante was one of the first goaltenders to skate behind the net to stop the puck.

He also was one of the first to raise his arm on an icing call to let his

defencemen know what was happening. He perfected a stand-up, positional

style, cutting down the angles; he became one of the first goaltenders to write a

how to book about the position. He was a pioneer of stick-handling the puck;

before that time, goaltenders passively stood in the net and simply deflected

pucks to teammates.
Plante was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1978, and into the

Quebec Sports Pantheon in 1994. His jersey, #1, was retired in 1995 by the

Montreal Canadiens. The Jacques Plante Memorial Trophy was established in

his honor as an award to the top goaltender in the Quebec Major Junior Hockey

League. The Jacques Plante Trophy was established in Switzerland after Plante's

death; it is given out annually to the top Swiss goaltender. The main arena in

Shawinigan the town he grew up in, was renamed to Aréna Jacques Plante.
Plante was selected by Sports Illustrated magazine to its 1991 all-time All-Star

team.


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This day in hockey history, January 17th 1996 the Detroit Red Wings defeated

the Colorado Avalanche 3-2 at Joe Louis Arena with Steve Yzerman scoring

his 500th career goal. He was only the second player in franchise history and

the 22nd player in NHL history to score 500 career goals.

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On this date in hockey history, January 17th 1971, the Boston Bruins took 63 shots on goal defeating the Toronto Maple Leafs 9-1 at Boston Garden. The loss dropped the Leafs record to 21-21-3


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On this date in hockey history, January 18, 1961 – Mark Messier was born in Edmonton Alberta. Messier was known as The Moose when he won five Stanley Cups with the Edmonton Oilers. When he signed with the New York Rangers he became known as The Mess-iah when he guaranteed a game six victory in the 1994 semi finals against the NJ Devils, then scored a hat trick to deliver that win. Messier spent six seasons with the Rangers before leaving when he signed with the Vancouver Canucks in 1997 as a 36 year old free agent after a money dispute with the Rangers. Messier's time in Vancouver was rocky, beginning with fan favorite Trevor Linden being forced to relinquish the captain's C for Messier. Then Messier wanted to wear his familiar number 11 even though the number had been unofficially retired by the Canucks after Wayne Maki died. For these resons and otherMessier was not embraced by Canucks fans. He underperformed with Vancouver with point totals of 60, 48 and 54 points, his worst totals since his rookie year. The team opted not to re-sign him when his contract expired. Messier returned to New York for four more seasons before retiring in 2004. In a little known transaction, Messier was traded by the Rangers on June 30, 2003 to the San Jose Sharks for a fourth round draft pick. Messier was a Shark for just a few hours before he re-signed with the Rangers as a free agent. Messier won the hart trophy in 1990 and 1992 and the Conn Smythe trophy in 1984. He was a 15 time all star.

On this date in hockey history, Vincent Damphousse of the Toronto Maple Leafs scored four goals during the 42nd annual NHL all star game at Chicago Stadium. Damphousse was playing for the Campbell Conference and his third period hat trick along with his first period goal earned him all star game MVP honors over Campbell's teammate Adam Oates of the St. Louis Blues who scored once and had four helpers, including three assists on Damphousses' goals. Mark Messier won the skills competition for shooting accuracy with four hits on six shots and al MacInnis had the hardest shot at 94 M.P.H.

On this date in hockey history, January 19 1984 – Roger Nielson was fired by the Vancouver Canucks GM Harry Neale. Nielson had been an assistant coach when Neale was Vancouver's head coach. With five games remaining in the 1981-82 season, Neale was suspended for ten games after an altercation with fans during a game in Quebec. Nielson took over as head coach in Nelae's absence and the Canucks went on a roll losing only once in those ten games. When his suspension ended, Neale opted to let Nielson continue as head coach and the Canucks rolled into the Stanley Cup finals losing to the New York Islanders. During game two of the conference finals against Chicago, Nielson was upset with the officiating and waved a white towel from the bench on the end of a hockey stick in mock surrender. Three of his players followed suit and were ejected from the game. When the Canucks returned home fans greeted the team at the airport waving white towels. When the Canucks hosted game three the arena was filled with fans waving white towels and one of hockey's greatest playoff traditons was born.


January 20th 1982 was a sad day in Toronto Maple Leafs history as the feud between Punch Imalch and Darryl Sittler reached it's crescendo with the Leafs trading Sittler to the Philadelphia Flyers for Rich Costello, a 2nd round draft choice in 1982 and future considerations. This was Leafs worst trade since giving up on Bernie Parent in 1973.
Sittler was coming off an excellent year in 1980-81 with 43 goals and 96 points. At the time of the trade he had 38 points in 38 games with the Leafs (18-30-48) then totaled 32 points for the Flyers in 35 games (18-20-38). In his first full season with the Flyers, Sittler put together another strong season with the Flyers in 1982-83 with 43 goals and 83 points. Costello played 4 games with the Leafs picking up five points otherwise spent the rest of his career in the minors and Europe.
The Leafs used the second round pick which was 25th overall in 1982 to draft Peter Ihnacek and the future considerations were paid off by sending Ken Strong to Toronto who played 11 games as Leafs with two goals and four points.


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On this date in hockey history, January 20, 1946, Max Bentley of the Chicago Black Hawks scored his fourth career hat tirck duringa 9-1 victory over the New York Rangers at Chicago Stadium before a then NHL record crowd of 19,749.

On this date in hockey history, January 19, 1932, Charlie Conacher scored five goals against goaltender Roy Worters during an 11-3 victory against the New York Americans becoming the first Toronto Maple Leaf to do dent the twine five times in one game. Conacher scored a hat trick or more 14 times as a Maple Leaf, only Darryl Sittler had more.



On this date in hockey history, January 20, 1984, Dave “Tiger” Williams scored a hat trick for the Vancouver Canucks during a 6-6 tie at Winnipeg. This was the first three goal game of “Tigers” NHL career.


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On this date in hockey history, January 20, 1982, Wayne Gretzky of the

Edmonton Oilers scored three goals in an 8-6 victory over the St. Louis Blues.

Gretzky scored one goal in each period, 58th, 59th and 60th goals of the season,

and added two assists. This was Gretzky's sixth hat trick of the season and he

wasn't even 21 years old. There wasn't a single power play goal scored because

there wasn't a single penalty assessed. The Blues outshot the Oilers 34 – 33.

On this date in hockey history, Januray 20, 1984, Dave “Tiger” Williams

scored a hat trick for the Vancouver Canucks during a 6-6 tie at Winnipeg.

This was the first three goal game of “Tigers” NHL career.


This day in Buffalo Sabres history, January 20th 1971, the Buffalo Sabres

defeated the Vancouver Canucks 1-0 with Don Luce scoring the goal. Roger

Crozier has 29 saves for the shutout and Dunc Wilson had 36 saves for the

'Nucks.


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This day in hockey history, January 20th 1989, Mario Lemieux became the second player in NHL history to score 50 goals in less than 50 games when he scored his 50th goal of the season in a 7-3 loss in Winnipeg in his 44th game of the year. The first was wayne Gretzky with 50 in 39 games.


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On this date in hockey history, December 21, 1930, Cooney Weiland scored the 100th goal of the season for the Boston Bruins as they defeated defeated the Chicago Black Hawks. The Bruins became the first NHL team to acore 100 goals in a single season.

On this date in hockey history, January 21, 1887, Georges Vezina the “Chicoutimi Cucumber” was born in Chicoutimi, Quebec. The man whose name is on the trophy awarded to the NHL's best netminder played for the Montreal Canadiens from the 1910-11 season to 1925-26. Vezina never missed a game, playing 328 straight regular season and 39 playoff games. He led the Habs to a pair of Stanley Cup championships and five appearances in the finals. His last game was the season opener in 1925. Vezina had been sick for nearly two months, losing 35 pounds. He had a temperature of 102 degrees when he vomited blood after the first period. He died from tuberculosis on March 27, 1926.


On this date in hockey history, January 21, 1986, Denis Potvin scored his 270th career goal as the New York Islanders defeated the Philadelphia Flyers 7-3. The goal tied Bobby Orr's career scoring record for defenseman. Potvin finished with 310 goals, fifth on the all time list behind #1 Ray Bourque (410), #2 Paul Coffey (396), #3 Al MacInnis (340) and #4 Phil Housley (338).



This day in hockey history, January 21st 1907, the Kenora Thistles won their

only Stanley Cup Championship, defeating the Montreal Wanderers 8-6 at

Montreal. The Kenora Thistles were an early amateur men's ice hockey team

based in Kenora, Ontario, Canada, formed in 1885 as a senior team by a group

of Lake of the Woods lumbermen. Their junior team started play in amateur

leagues in the 1890s, and ceased playing in 1907, playing against Manitoba and Northwestern Ontario based teams.
The town of Kenora was originally known as Rat Portage. In the late 1880s, an

amateur senior hockey club was formed by older professional men, most of

them lumbermen, gold prospectors, or individuals in the local mining businesses.

By the early 1890s, several young boys of the Rat Portage area, most of them

between the ages of 9-11, formed a junior ice hockey team of the same name,

which went on to beat the senior team in an exhibition. Among these young

men were future Hockey Hall of Famers Tommy Phillips, Tom Hooper, Billy

McGimsie, and Silas Griffis.
Over the next five years, these young players began to populate the senior team

and quickly established themselves as one of the premier amateur hockey clubs

of the western Canadian provinces. In 1903 they challenged the Ottawa Silver

Seven for the Stanley Cup and lost. In 1905 they again challenged the Ottawa

squad with the same disappointing results. That summer, the town of Rat Portage

changed its name to Kenora.
In January 1907 the Thistles again challenged for the Cup, winning it in a

two-game, total-goals series against the Montreal Wanderers. Two other future

Hockey Hall of Famers, Art Ross and "Bad" Joe Hall were added to the roster

from Brandon, although Hall did not play. The games were played on January

17 and 21 in Montreal. Phillips scored seven goals in the two games and Kenora

defeated the Wanderers 12–8, winning both games 4–2 and 8–6.
Just two months later, the Thistles were challenged by the Wanderers to a re-match. Despite importing the services of three more future Hockey Hall of Famers

(Alf Smith, Harry "Rat" Westwick, and Frederick Whitcroft), the team lost the

Stanley Cup and most of its noted players afterward to other professional teams,

family life, or retirement. Roxy Beaudro retired, Si Griffis moved to British

Columbia, Billy McGimsie retired due to his injury, Tommy Phillips signed

with Ottawa and Fred Whitcroft signed with Edmonton. Smith and Westwick

returned to Ottawa.
Roster
Centres:
Billy McGimsie
Harry Westwick (rover)†
Fred Whitcroft (rover)†&.
Wingers"
Roxy Beaudro (also played point)
Tom Phillips (Captain)
Russell Phillips
Alf Smith (right wing)†&
Defencemen:
Tom Hooper (also played Rover)
Art Ross (Point)††
Silas Griffis (Coverpoint)
Joe Hall (Coverpoint did not play)††
Goaltender:
Eddie Giroux
† Not part of team when Kenora won the Stanley Cup in January 1907.

However, Harry Westwick, Fred Whitcroft, and Alf Smith joined the team in

March 1907 to play against the Brandon Wheat Kings in 2 playoff games.
†† Left the team after winning the Stanley Cup, Art Ross, and Joe Hall were

not part of the team, when Kenora defeated Brandon in 2 game playoff for

Manitoba League Title/Stanley Cup.
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This day in hockey history, January 21st 1945, the Boston Bruins defeated the New York Rangers 14-3 at the Boston Gardens. The Bruins scored four times in minute and twenty seconds in the second period setting an NHL record for the fastest four goals by one team. Bill Cowley had four goals for the B's with Ken Smith adding three goals and an assist.


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This day in hockey history, January 21st 1989, the Hartford Whalers beat the

Los Angeles Kings 5-4 at the Hartford Civic Center despite Wayne Gretzky's

goal and three assists for the Kings. The four points gave Wayne 1,771 career

points passing Marcel Dionne's 1,770 points into second place in NHL career

scoring behind only Gordie Howe with 1850 points.


Gretzky reached 100 points on the season in that game for a record 10th

consecutive season.


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This day in New York Rangers history, January 22nd 1967, Harry Howell

becomes the first player in franchise history to play 1,000 games for the

blueshirts.

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This day in New York Rangers history, January 22nd 1980, Ron Duguay tied a

franchise record with two short-handed goals in a 5-4 win over the

Los Angeles Kings.



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This day in hockey history, January 21st 1985, Marcel Dionne scored his 611th career goal to move past Bobby Hull (610 goals) into third place on the NHL career goal scoring list. Dionne's first period goal helped the Kings to build a 7-3 lead but the Oilers came back with five third period goals to win 8-7.
Wayne Gretzky had a rather pedestrian outing for him with only one goals and one assist. here is the scoring summary;
1st Period
1 - LAK : Maclellan 20 (Hakansson, Dionne) (EV) 10:04
2 - LAK : Miller 1 (Shutt, Hardy) (EV) 10:41
3 - LAK : Dionne 28 (Hardy) (EV) 13:17
4 - LAK : Mokosak 2 (Shutt) (EV) 14:35
2nd Period
5 - EDM : Lindstrom 8 (EV) 10:47
6 - LAK : Redmond 3 (Miller, Lapointe) (EV) 14:58
7 - LAK : Taylor 25 (Dionne, Redmond) (EV) 17:21
8 - EDM : Jackson 2 (Anderson, Melnyk) (EV) 17:33
9 - LAK : Wells 2 (Hardy, Dionne) (EV) 18:17
10 - EDM : Lindstrom 9 (Carroll, Fogolin) (EV) 18:32
3rd Period
11 - EDM : Gretzky 48 (Hughes) (SH) 0:56
12 - EDM : Jackson 3 (Kurri, Huddy) (EV) 9:49
13 - EDM : Kurri 45 (Coffey, Anderson) (PP) 14:05
14 - EDM : Lowe 4 (Semenko, Carroll) (EV) 14:22
15 - EDM : Coffey 18 (Gretzky, Fogolin) (EV) 17:12
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On this date in hockey history, January 22nd 1966, the Hamilton Red Wings made their NHL debut. Or did they? The Detroit Red Wings were scheduled to play at Montreal on January 22nd. Unfortunately, their unifroms were stolen from their locket room at the Forum the night before the game. So the Red Wings wore the uniforms of their junior affilaite the Hamilton Red Wings during the game against the Canadiens. Wearing the Hamilton jerseys, Roger Crozier earned his 15th career shotout as the Red Wings defeated the Habs 3-0.

On this date in hockey history, January 22nd 1987, an NHL game was played in front of 334 fans when the New Jersey Devils hosted the Calgary Flames. An epic snow storm had delayed the start of the game for two hours. In a classy move, the Devils PR department wrote down the names and addresses of every fan in attendance and created a club for the known as the 334 club.

Devils forward Doug Sulliman was the games first star and recalled the event;

"What I wasn't ready for was all the abandoned cars that were stuck. I couldn't get on the ramp to go two miles to the Meadowlands. So what I had to do was go on the other side of the road and I drove the whole way there in reverse. It was an adventure. "You went out and there was no one in the stands and there was no music playing. It was eerie. Doug Carpenter was our coach and he said, 'Just keep hiding people. We're not going out there until we have 16 or 17 guys.' They were hiding in the medical room, hiding in the stick room.

"I think the Flames had three warm-ups that day.  Nick Fotiu was firing pucks into the stands. Then finally we get enough guys to go out for warm-up. We were so goofy. We're warming up, we're reading magazines, we're hanging out. It was sort of like a beer-league game. "There were 334 people and I'm sure half of them just wanted to get out of the storm. They walked in and got a hot dog and a beer and thought 'Let's sit here for a while.'"

On this date in Buffalo Sabres history;
January 22, 1988: Phil Housley records his second career hat trick in a 7-3 win

over New Jersey. Housley still holds the Sabres’ franchise record for most

career hat tricks by defenseman (2).
January 22, 1989: Lindy Ruff scores his 100th NHL goal in a 6-4 win at home

against the Bruins.



On this date in hockey history, January 23rd 1984, the Buffalo Sabres defeated

the Bruins at the Boston Garden, becoming the first NHL team to win ten

consecutive games on the road.


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This date in hockey history, Januray 23rd 1983, at Northlands Coliseum

Wayne Gretzky scored once and added three assists for four points, picking

up his 400th career assist during the Edmonton Oilers 8-6 victory over the

Los Angeles Kings. That gave Gretzky 400 assists in only 290 career games,

a remarkable accomplishment, unthinkable in today's NHL.


This day in hockey history, January 23rd 1976, the Washington Capitals ended

their team-record 25 game winless streak (0-22-3) with a 7-5 win over the

New York Rangers in Landover, MD. Garnet "Ace" Bailey led the way for the

Caps with two goals and an assist.



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This date in hockey history, January 24th 1981, Mike Bossy scored two goals when the New York Islanders defeated the Quebec Nordiques 7-4. This gave Bossy 50 goals in 50 games. He became the first player to accomplish this historic feat since Maurice Richard did so in the 1944-45 season.

On this date in hockey history, January 24th 1981, Charlie Simmer scores his third career hat trick for Los Angeles in the Boston Garden as the Kings defeated the Bruins 6-4. This gave Simmer 49 goals in 50 games, missing the historic 50 in 50 by one goal.

On this date in hockey history, January 24th, 1960, Glenn Hall and the Chicago Blackhawks lost 3-2 to the Montreal Canadiens. This was Hall's 328th

consecutive game tieing Georges Vezina's record for consecutive games played

by a goaltender. Hall would extend this record to 502 games, another record

unthinkable by today's standard. No doubt this record will never be broken.


This date in hockey history, January 24th 1999, Wayne Gretzky had a goal and

two assists, and was named the game's MVP as the North American team beat

the World team 8-6, in the NHL All Star game played in Tampa Bay. Arturs

Irbe became the first goaltender to pick up an assist in an All Star Game.



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On this date in hockey history, January 25th 1964, Phil Esposito of the Chicago

Black Hawks scored his first NHL goal against Detroit's Terry Sawchuk.

Chicago lost the game 5-3..

On this date in hockey history, January 25th, 1991, the St. Louis Blues Brett Hull scored twice and added a pair of helpers in a 9-4 victory against the Detroit Red Wings. The goals were his 49th and 50th of the season and that was his 49th game, maikng him the fifth player in NHL history to score 50 goals in 50 or fewer games.

This date in Buffalo Sabres history, January 25th 1977, Rick Martin scores two goals in the 3rd period including the game winner with 1:56 remaining. He led the Wales Conference all stars in a 4-3 victory over the Campbell Conference all stars earning Martin MVP honors. Marcel Dionne assisted on both of Martin's goals. The game was played in Vancouver's Pacific Coliseum.

On this date in hockey history, January 26th, 1921, the Toronto St. Patricks defeated the Hamilton Tigers 10-3. Cord Denneny scored six goals for the St. Pats.

On this date in hockey history, January 26th , Wayne Gretzky was born in Brantford Ontario. Gretzky would go on to become the NHL's career scoring leader. In a related development, Gordie Howe scored his 467th goal that same day.

On this date in hockey history, January 26, 1991, Wayne Gretzky enjoyed a birthday bonanza with three goals and two assists as the Los Angeles Kings defeated the Vancouver Canucks 5-4.

This date in hockey history, January 27th, 1955, Gordie Howe outshot the New York Rangers 19 – 18. That's right, Gordie took 19 shots in one game. Lorne “Gump” Worsley stopped all 19 shots but surrendered three goals on the 12 shots the rest of the Red Wings took in a 3-3 tie. Detroit outshot New York 31 – 18.

On this day in hockey history, January 27, 1913, Harry Hylund scored eight goals for the Montreal Wanderers as they defeated the Quebec Bulldogs 10-6 in a National Hockey Association (NHA) game. The NHA was the predecessor of the NHL which was formed in 1917. Hyland first played pro hockey for the Montreal Shamrocks in 1908-09, joining the Montreal Wanderers in 1909-10 where the club won the Stanley Cup. He played for the Wanderers until they folded in 1918, except for one season where he joined the Pacific Coast Hockey Association (PCHA) New Westminster Royals. After the Wanderers folded, he joined the Ottawa Senators, where he was named playing coach. He retired the following year.

On this date in hockey history, January 27th, 1979, Ulf Nilsson tallied five points for the New York Rangers as they defeated the New York Islanders 7-2 in Nassau Coliseum. The victory ended the Islanders 23 game home unbeaten streak.

On this date in hockey history, January 27, 1984, Wayne Gretzky's point scoring streak reached it's final game. Wayne scored his 61st goal of the season for his 51st consecutive game with at least one point during a 3-3 tie with the New Jersey Devils at Edmonton's Northlands Coliseum. He went 61-92-153 during the streak, three points a game.

On this date in hockey history, January 27th, 1989, Steve Yzerman scored three points (1-2-3) as the Detroit Red Wings defeated the Toronto Maple Leafs 8-1. That gave Yzerman 100 points in his 50th game of the season, making him only the fourth NHL player to score 100 points in 50 or fewer games, preceeded by Wayne Gretzky, Mario Lemieux and Bernie Nicholls.





On this date in hockey history, January 28, 1973, Henry Boucha of the Detroit Red Wings scored six seconds after the opening faceoff during a 4-2 victory over the Montreal Canadiens. This set an NHL record for the fastest goal from the start of a game.

On this date in hockey history, January 28th, 1995, Neal Broten played in his 1,000th career game, a 3-1 victory by the New Jersey Devils over the Florida Panthers, only the third U.S. born player to do so. He won the Stanley Cup with the Devils a few months later.





January 28, 1992 – Brett Hull became just the second player in NHL history to record back to back seasons of 50 goals in 50 games when he scored in a 3-3 tie against the Kings. The first player to accomplish the feat was on the other side of the ice, who was, of course, Wayne Gretzky, who did it in the 1982-83 and 1983-84 seasons





This date in Buffalo Sabres history, January 29th, 1971, rookie Gilbert Perreault scored the Sabres first, and his first career hat trick during a 4-2 win at Oakland agaonst the California Seals. On this date in Buffalo sabres history, January 29th 1977, the legenday Blizzard of '77 crippled the Buffalo NY area. The Sabres were scheduled to play in Montreal and were lucky to have 14 players make it to the airport (some by snowmobile) to fly to Montreal. Sabres broadcaster Ted Darling was stranded at his home in Lockport and called the game by telephone while watching it on his television set! The shorthanded Sabres came through with a 3-3 tie against the dynastic Canadiens.



On this date in Toronto Maple Leafs history, January 30th 1981, the Leafs traded a third round draft pick to the Colorado Rockies for Rene Robert. Robert had begun his NHL career with the Leafs
playing three years of junior hockey with the Trois-Rivieres Leafs of the QJHL beginning in 1965-66 with 13 goals and 38 assists for 51 points in 42 games. in 1966–67 he had 34 goals and 66 points in 42 games and in 1967–68 scored an outstanding 69 goals and 143 points in 49 games.
Robert then turned pro with the Leafs farm team the Tulsa Oilers playing three games in 1967–68 with two assists. In 1968–69 he played 59 games for Tulsa scoring 21 times and adding 39 assists for 51 points.
In 1969-70 he starred with Toronto's AHL farm team the Rochester Americans with 23 goals and 63 points in 49 games. back in Tulsa the next season Robert scored 26 goals with 36 assists for 62 points in 58 games before finishing the season with the Phoenix Roadrunners with seven points (3-4-7) in seven games and a nice playoff run with five goals and eight points in ten games.
Robert was then acquired by the Buffalo Sabres in the 1971 intra league draft in the second round 13th overall. But the Sabres dropped Robert from their protected list to make room for Dick Duff to start the fourth round. Robert was promptly claimed by the Pittsburgh Penguins with the 18th pick. Interestingly, Pittsburgh had also claimed former Leaf and future Sabre Tim Horton from the New York Rangers with the 12th pick in that draft, one spot before Buffalo's claim of Robert.
Robert was reacquired by Buffalo on March 4th 1972 in a trade with Pittsburgh for Eddie Shack and went on to fame as the right winger on the French Connection line with Rick Martin and Gilbert Perreault.
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This date in Buffalo Sabres history, January 30th 1990, the Sabres defeated the Quebec Nordiques 5-2 with Phil Housley scoring the first three on five short handed goal in franchise history. It seems like the Nords were the ideal opponent to exploit in this manner as they finished with a miserable 12-61-7 record and a goal differential of -167. Ouch !! That's a deficit of two goals per game. Quebec scored 240 goals while surrendering 407 that season. Their reward was the first selection in the 1990 entry draft which they used to draft Owen Nolan.
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This day in hockey history history, January 30th 1990, the Los Angeles Kings defeated the New Jersey Devils 5-2 with Wayne Gretzky picking up a single assist. with that point, Gretzky set an NHL record by recording at least 100 points for the 11th consecutive season. He finished the season with 142 points and had 163 points in 1990-91 and 121 in 1991-92 extending the record to 13 consecutive seasons. He also scored 40 or more goals in his first 12 seasons.
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This date in hockey history, January 30th 1990, the St. Louis Blues defeated the New York Islanders 2-1 with’ rookie goaltender Curtis Joseph picking up his first career NHL victory as his team beat the Islanders 2-1. He was nicknamed Cujo and sported goalie masks with the Cujo design, a viscous dog featured in the Stephen King movies.
Cujo has 454 career wins, fourth on the all time list. He also has the distinction of having the most wins among all goaltenders without ever winning the Stanley Cup. He did win a gold medal with Canada inthe 2002 winter Olympics.
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On this date in Toronto Maple Leafs history, January 29th, 1906, Joe Primeau was born in Lindsay, Ontario. Primeau was the center of the famous Kid Line with Busher Jackson and Charlie Conacher. He was raised in Victoria British Columbia and moved to Toronto as a youngster. Primeau played his NHL career exclusively with the Maple Leafs, beginning his professional career with the Toronto Ravinas of the CPHL in 1927-28 where he was the leading scorer for coach Frank J. Selke. Primeau only played seven NHL seasons as a regular from 1929-30 to 1935-36 but during a low scoring era had 66 goals 127 assists and 243 points in 310 games. He was one of the great playmakers in NHL history, leading the league in assists three times in 1931, 1932 and 1934 and finishing second in league scoring twice in 1932 and 1934. Primeau won a Stanley Cup in 1932 and retired young at age 30 to manage his construction business. He coached the Leafs for one season in 1950-51, winning a second Stanley Cup when his team defeated his former coach frank Selke and the Montreal Canadiens. He was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1963.

On this date in hockey history, January 29th, 1978, Bobby Clarke scored his 250th goal as a Flyer in a 3-3 tie with the Detroit. Clarke finished with 358 goals in his NHL career where he played 1,144 games wiith Philadelphia. He finshed as the Flyers all time leader in points (1210), assists (852), games played and fourth in goals scored behind Bill Barber (420), Brian Propp (369) and Tim Kerr (363). Passed over by every NHL team in the first round in his draft year in 1969 because of his diabetes, Clarke was taken by the Flyers in the second round in one of the great draft day steals of all time. Clarke was perhaps the greatest two way forward in league history and along with the Leafs Ted Kennedy in the 1940's the foremost example of a team captain providing champion caliber leadership through hard work combined with skill. Clarke's toothelss grin is one of the most iconic images in NHL history.

On this date in hockey history, January 30th 1973, the 1973 NHL All Star Game was played at Madison Square Garden. Greg Polis of the Pittsburgh Penguins scored a pair of goals and earned the MVP award as the Eastern Conference defeated the West 5-4.

On this date in hockey history, January 30th, 1937, Nels Stewart of the New York Americans scored his 270th goal in a 4-0 victory over the Montreal Canadiens to pass Howie Morenz as the NHL's all time career leader in goal scoring.

On this date in hockey history, January 30th, 1960, Dean Prentice scored the 5,000th goal in Rangers history as the New York Rangers lost 3-2 at Maple Leafs Gardens.